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Mount Sinai is Bringing Our A-Game to Help You Keep Yours

Experts from the Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Available for Interviews

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 7, 2016

Contact: David Slotnick
Mount Sinai Press Office
(212) 241‐9200
NewsMedia@mssm.edu

Mount Sinai is Bringing Our A-Game to Help You Keep Yours
Experts from the Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Available for Interviews

Newswise — (New York – July 7, 2016) –– The Mount Sinai Hospital will serve as the Official Medical Services Provider of the US Open for the fourth year in a row. Orthopaedic surgeons, sports medicine physicians, and radiologists from Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, Mount Sinai Roosevelt, and The Mount Sinai Hospital, and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai will be on-site through the entire tournament.

In addition, Alexis Chiang Colvin, MD, Associate Professor of Sports Medicine in the Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and team physician for the US Fed Cup Team, will continue her role at the tournament as chief medical officer of the United States Tennis Association (USTA). James Gladstone, MD, Co-Chief of the Sports Medicine Service at The Mount Sinai Hospital, Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine, serves as medical advisor to the US Davis Cup tennis team and will serve as a consultant to the US Open.

Throughout the year, as well as during the tournament, Mount Sinai experts are available for commentary on the following topics:

Proper Preparation for Sports: James Gladstone, Co-Chief of the Sports Medicine Service, Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Mount Sinai and the Medical Advisor to the U.S. Davis Cup team can speak about best steps for staying healthy before and during physical activity. He recommends raising your core temperature approximately 20-30 minutes before a match or game through dynamic stretching, light jogging or using a stationary bike. He also recommends maintaining proper hydration levels and applying sunscreen at least 30 minutes before outdoor competition. Having a light snack or recovery drink no later than 30-40 minutes after a competition is ideal, as well as a regular meal 1-2 hours later. He also recommends at least 8 hours of sleep per night and a power nap during the day.

Avoiding and Treating Back Injuries: Andrew Hecht, MD, Chief of Spine Surgery for The Mount Sinai Health System as well as Director of the Spine Hospital at Mount Sinai and Associate Professor of Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is expert in spine injuries in athletes, cervical spine surgery and lumbar spine surgery. He is the spine surgical consultant for the NY Jets and Islanders and sit on the NFL brain and spine committee. He can discuss injuries that effect elite athletes (pro, Olympic, collegiate) as well as weekend warriors. He can also discuss most modern surgical techniques for cervical and lumbar spine surgery and, motion preservation surgery, and minimally invasive surgery. He can also discuss the collaborative and interdisciplinary nature of modern spine care.

Avoiding and Treating Shoulder Injuries: Leesa Galatz, MD, Professor and System Chair of the Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and System Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery for the Mount Sinai Health System, is available to speak about the best ways to avoid rotator cuff or other shoulder injuries, as well as the many options available if you do suffer an injury. She is a national and international expert in shoulder surgery and also has extensive experience in research on tendon injury and repair. She has lectured and written extensively on treatment methods and science behind shoulder injury and prevention.

Avoiding and Treating Foot and Ankle Injuries: Steven Weinfeld, MD, Associate Professor in the Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, is available to speak about the best ways to prevent ankle sprains and other foot and ankle injuries, as well as the best steps to take if you do experience an injury. He suggests strengthening the leg and foot muscles as the best way to minimize the risk of sprains. If you do get a sprain, rest, ice, and compression can often help with healing.

Keeping Your Mind on the Game: Brian Iacoviello, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, is available to discuss some of the mental techniques which can help athletes, both professional and amateur, maximize their performances. One trick is to spend a little time before the game to familiarize oneself with the upcoming match and to set appropriate expectations; this includes things like taking a look at the playing area, and seeing what to expect in terms of conditions. Increasing your knowledge and reducing uncertainty can help enhance confidence, which is key to a top performance.

Avoiding and Treating Knee Injuries: Alexis Colvin, MD, Chief Medical Officer of the US Tennis Association and Associate Professor of Sports Medicine in the Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, is available to discuss ways to protect your hips and knees from injury while playing sports, as well as the options for treatment if you do suffer an injury. Dr. Colvin recommends that you warm up thoroughly before exercise in order to prevent injury, including stretching all the major muscles around the hips and knees. If you are injured, there are a number of treatment options to discuss with your doctor including anti-inflammatory medications, viscosupplementation, or injection of lubricating fluids into the knee, or minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery.

How to Know if a Minor Injury is Something Serious: Melissa Leber, MD, Assistant Professor of Sports Medicine and Emergency Medicine in the Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, is available to discuss how to tell when a minor pain or simple injury might be a sign of something more serious. If you develop pain after physical exertion that does not improve with rest and over the counter pain relievers, you should make an appointment with your doctor. If you become lightheaded, experience blurred vision or chest pain, or lose consciousness, you should seek immediate emergency medical help.

About the Mount Sinai Health System
The Mount Sinai Health System is New York City’s largest integrated delivery system encompassing seven hospital campuses, a leading medical school, and a vast network of ambulatory practices throughout the greater New York region. Mount Sinai’s vision is to produce the safest care, the highest quality, the highest satisfaction, the best access and the best value of any health system in the nation.

The System includes approximately 6,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 10 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is ranked as one of the nation’s top 10 hospitals in Geriatrics, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, and Gastroenterology, and is in the top 25 in five other specialties in the 2015-2016 “Best Hospitals” issue of U.S. News World Report. Mount Sinai’s Kravis Children’s Hospital also is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News World Report. The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked 11th nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel is ranked regionally.

For more information, visit http://www.mountsinai.org/, or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

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