Share

Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation Effective for Treating Knee Cartilage Injuries in Active Individuals, Research Shows

Add to Favorites

Contact Information

<!–

–>

Available for logged-in reporters only

<!–

–>

Newswise — COLORADO SPRINGS, CO – For athletes and rarely active patients who means cartilage injuries to their knee, an osteochondral allograft transplantation can be a successful diagnosis option, according to investigate presented currently during a American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO. The investigate showed these patients were consistently means to lapse to competition or recreational activities after a surgery, yet frequently during a reduce activity level.

“We examined a success of osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation in 149 knees, and found 113, or 76% of those treated with a surgery, had returned to activity during an normal follow-up of 6 years,” commented William Bugbee, MD, lead author from a Scripps Clinic in La Jolla, CA. “Patients who are rarely active can be disheartened by these forms of injuries, so we are happy to see a success of this diagnosis option.”

An OCA involves transplantation of donated osteochondral hankie to a forsake in a target patient’s knee joint. In this study, a normal age of a subjects was 31 years old, with 59% being male. While a investigate showed certain statistics relating to ubiquitous lapse to activity, usually 28% returned during a same turn pre-injury, and 48% returned to one or some-more though not all of a same sports and activities.

“We also saw an altogether 90% survivorship of a transplanted grafts during a 6-year follow-up,” remarkable Bugbee. “This presents serve justification that a procedure, generally in those people who are rarely active, can be certain for liberation and destiny jaunty goals.”

This investigate adds to prior investigate that shows long-term organic alleviation in knees after OCA transplant.

###

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) is a tellurian personality in orthopaedic sports medicine education, research, communication and fellowship, and includes inhabitant and general sports medicine leaders. The Society works closely with many other sports medicine specialists, including jaunty trainers, earthy therapists, family physicians, and others to urge a identification, prevention, treatment, and reconstruction of sports injuries. AOSSM is also a first partner of a STOP Sports Injuries debate to forestall overuse and dire injuries in kids.

Comment/Share

Leave a comment…


Leave a Comment