Share

Tigers involved in fatal attack at Beijing zoo park to remain in enhanced enclosure

The tigers involved an attack that left one woman dead and her daughter severely injured after they left their car in wildlife park near Beijing in July will be kept “in captivity,” instead of being put down, a spokesman said.

On July 23, a 57-year-old woman was killed by a tiger, and her daughter seriously injured, after they got out of their car in the enclosure, despite there being multiple signs warning visitors to stay inside their vehicles.

Woman in serious condition after tiger attack kills mother in Beijing wildlife park

The Badaling Wildlife World park in Yanqing district of Beijing, which had been closed since the tragedy while an investigated was conducted, reopened to the public on Thursday, although the tiger enclosure remained closed.

The park has temporarily replaced self-driving tours in the big cat zone with bus tours, Xinhua reported.

The tigers are protected wild animals, and the zoo has no power to kill them,” the spokesman said. Instead, they will remain “in captivity” – meaning, they will still be free to roam around their enclosure which is upgrading security.

“The tigers are still free in the captivated areas,” the spokesperson said. “When the tiger zone reopens to the public, everything returned to normal.”

The park is improving its security in the tiger zone. Self-drive tours are expected to resume after the reconstruction, he said.

The attack on the two women was not first such incident in the park. In October 2012, an elderly woman was severely injured by a tiger while on her way to a toilet in the same park, and an inspector was mauled to death by tigers in August 2014 after he got out of his patrol car.

Authorities rule wildlife park not responsible for fatal tiger attack

More details emerged on Thursday about the investigation report of the fatal attack.

You Changcun, from the Yanqing work safety department, said that even though the tiger attack happened during business hours at the wildlife park, the case was not ruled to be an “industrial security accident” because the park was ruled not responsible for the attacks.

The judgment was held because patrol officers in the zone had warned the victims when they exited the car, which stopped only 13 metres from the tigers’ shelter, according to the report.

In response to the report, the victim’s family believes the authorities overlooked the park’s responsibility in the attack, and a relative told the Southern Metropolis Daily newspaper that they would appeal the decision.